Tyler greever

Tyler Greever, BJ ‘15, loved sports his whole life, but it wasn’t until he came to the Missouri School of Journalism that he started combining this passion with his love of writing.

 

“I picked up writing in high school, and I just fell in love with the craft of it,” Greever says. “Mizzou taught me about writing - the careful choice of words, finding the story and finding your voice in everything you write.”

 

Greever got involved in a variety of campus media outlets during his time at the J-School, such as MUTV and KCOU. As part of his broadcast studies, he got hours of on-camera experience at KOMU. Students working at KOMU average coverage of 5.5 hours of news everyday.

 

Greever says that the hands-on experience he got at MUTV and KOMU at the Missouri School of Journalism is what most prepared him for his career.

 

“I could shake off any nerves or any confidence issues,” Greever says. “I got to try new things, new segments I’d never done before… I also got to listen to so many amazing professors and my talented co-workers.”

 

Greever now works as a sports anchor and reporter for WJTV, a CBS affiliate, in Jackson, Mississippi. He writes scripts, sets up for shows, shoots and edits video, anchors and prepares for any breaking news that may come his way.

 

“I wouldn’t be here if it weren’t for Mizzou. Period,” he says.

 

Greever’s Broadcast 2 professor, Greeley Kyle, taught from his own experiences at WMC-TV in Memphis, Tennessee. Greever considers him a huge influence and mentor.

 

“Greeley was the type of professor that reached into his pocket and pulled out kick-ass lectures every single time,” Greever says. “He really lit a fire under me and inspired me to just work as hard as I possibly could.”

 

Greever’s hard work led him to his job at WJTV, where every Sunday night he co-hosts a show called “Sports Zone,” which won Best Sports Program from the Mississippi Associated Press Broadcasters Awards in 2016.

 

Greever also credits his classmates for helping him learn how to do television reporting. There is a tradition of upperclassmen passing down knowledge and a passion for journalism to younger students.

“The biggest thing I took away from Mizzou was how much we students want to help each other out. I learned so much from the older men and women above me at KOMU,” Greever says. “I still talk to them almost everyday and send them my clips and my stories to ask how I can make them better. I’ve been doing that since my sophomore year, and I never stopped.”

 

“To this day, I still get goosebumps standing on the sidelines of a packed stadium with the national anthem playing,” Greever says. “That’s how I know I really love doing what I do”